How Hispanic Millennials Are Consuming TV Content
Hispanic young adults are known for being early adopters of digital technology. In the past, Hispanic families have been more likely to have one TV set in the household that they sat down to watch together. With content now available on computers, tablets, and smartphones offers more options, how have their viewing habits changed?[[MORE]]
Tr3s talked to Latino young adults about what devices they prefer for watching TV content as part of its recently-released its 2014 study, “Hispanic Adult Millennials at Work and Play.”
Here are key insights from that study on the changing viewing habits of Hispanic young adults:
The “common area” TV set still dominates. Virtually all Hispanic and non-Hispanic Millennials said they watch content on a traditional TV set—and 9 out of 10 say that it offers the best experience. Among both groups, 7 out of 10 say their most of their “common area” TV set viewing happens with other people.
Tablets in the “common area” allow a social viewing experience with more choices. With tablets, it’s possible to watch whatever you want while still being in the presence of others. Among Millennials, 61% of Hispanics and 65% of non-Hispanics view content on their tablets while someone else watches a regular TV set in the same room.
Bedrooms are for “me time” viewing. Half of Hispanic and non-Hispanic Millennials watch TV content in their bedrooms, and 7 out of 10 watch alone. Many use computers and tablets here for entertainment content. (48% of Hispanics and 42% of non-Hispanics use computers for watching entertainment, 44% of Hispanics and 32% of non-Hispanics use tablets.) Tablets are highly personal devices that are less likely to be shared. 7 out of 10 Hispanic tablet users say they like to “cuddle up” with them in bed.
Smartphones are for watching content on the go, as well as for privacy. Nearly half (48%) of Hispanic Millennials watch TV on their smartphones to kill time while they’re out and about. They engage in smartphone viewing at a much lower rate than non-Hispanics (71%), likely because Hispanics tend to go out with others more than alone. Privacy is also a big draw for Hispanic and non-Hispanic young people—half of both groups view on their smartphones to watch what they want, when they want.   High-res

How Hispanic Millennials Are Consuming TV Content

Hispanic young adults are known for being early adopters of digital technology. In the past, Hispanic families have been more likely to have one TV set in the household that they sat down to watch together. With content now available on computers, tablets, and smartphones offers more options, how have their viewing habits changed?

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In Their Careers, Millennials Want Fulfillment and Diverse Opportunities
What do Millennials aspire to when they consider their career possibilities? How has coming of age in a difficult economy shaped their goals for future work? [[MORE]] 
These questions were answered in a new study by Viacom International Media Networks, “MTV Knowing Youth: 2020 Vision.” This report, which also gave insight into who global Millennials are and how they envision the world in 2020, was based on an online survey of people ages 15 to 24 across 32 countries, as well as ethnographic videos and interviews in 17 markets.
Taken from that report, here are some key insights on what Millennials think about their futures in the world of work:
A fulfilling job is their ultimate aim. Millennials want to find work that’s enjoyable and that brings meaning to their lives. Liking what they do is a primary goal – and the competitiveness of the job market may be what’s driving their desire for meaningful work. With low expectations for finding a high-paying job, they instead hope to find work that satisfies them in a deeper way.  
Money is secondary to happiness – and financial stability holds more appeal than wealth. For Millennials, a job that plays to their passions is preferable to one that simply pays well. Happiness comes first. They appreciate the value of emotional wealth highly — possibly more than previous generations. This is not to say that financial security is unimportant, however. Many talk about wanting money, but they’re not necessarily driven by the prospect of getting rich. Instead, their preference is to have enough financial stability for money not to be a concern.
They accept — and even welcome — the fact that a job for life is no longer as relevant now. Millennials realize that this way of looking at work is very different from their parents, who may have spent their entire careers in one job or field. They also recognize that there are new careers on the horizon that don’t even exist today. To set along a fixed path now could shut off further opportunities down the line.
They’re seeking out portfolio careers. Many Millennials have an area in mind that they’d like to pursue, but there is an underlying expectation that this is one step along a much larger journey. There will be twists and turns that they can’t foresee, so a portfolio career makes the most of their creativity and adaptability. This diversity of possibilities also provides an added sense of excitement about what the future will hold.
They can exercise different sides of themselves by pursuing multiple career paths.  Many young people dream of combining a creative profession (like singer, musician, artist, or entrepreneur) with something more traditional, like doctor or lawyer. A portfolio career like this allows them to express themselves in different ways and ensures that their lives are as fulfilling as they can be.   High-res

In Their Careers, Millennials Want Fulfillment and Diverse Opportunities


What do Millennials aspire to when they consider their career possibilities? How has coming of age in a difficult economy shaped their goals for future work?

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Comedy Central Power of Laughter Won Big at ESOMAR Congress 2014

Earlier today, Comedy Central International’s Power of Laughter project won the award for Best Methodological Paper at ESOMAR Congress 2014 in Nice, France. James Guerrier, Research Director for Comedy Central International, presented the study and accepted the award on behalf of all involved.

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Comedy Central and MTV India Present at ESOMAR Congress 2014
Viacom took the stage earlier today at ESOMAR Congress 2014, which kicked off in Nice, France on Sunday, September 7th. ESOMAR, a global organization that encourages, advances and elevates market research worldwide, has chosen the theme “What Inspires?” for this year’s three-day event.[[MORE]] Comedy Central’s James Guerrier, presented Power of Laughter, a study that measures comedy’s effectiveness in engaging audiences. Sumeli Chatterjee and Shibani Nayak of MTV India focused on the recent Curious Minds study in their session, “What Inspires the Curious Generation.”   High-res

Comedy Central and MTV India Present at ESOMAR Congress 2014


Viacom took the stage earlier today at ESOMAR Congress 2014, which kicked off in Nice, France on Sunday, September 7th. ESOMAR, a global organization that encourages, advances and elevates market research worldwide, has chosen the theme “What Inspires?” for this year’s three-day event.

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VIMN Insights: Beta Life Reloaded
On an average day, how do young people use the vast amount of media available to them? How are their entertainment habits evolving as technology plays a greater and greater role in everyday life? [[MORE]]
In 2009, MTV Knowing Youth conducted a study, “Beta Life,” to understand the impact of technology on global youth’s media and entertainment consumption. Earlier this year, MTV Knowing Youth commissioned another study to see what’s changed since 2009—and to identify what is most important to young people right now.
Here are key findings from this new project, called “Beta Life Reloaded”:
Young people are gorging on content and communications, averaging 3 hours of media activity for every hour they’re awake. 
They average 47 hours of media activity in an average Saturday (exceeding 24 hours because they consume multiple forms at once)
In 2009, they averaged 23 hours a day—which means their content consumption doubled in 5 years
For every hour they’re awake, they consume 3 hours of media and entertainment (15 hours awake, 47 hours of media)
They send an average of 69 digital messages per day, making communications are a staple of their daily diets.
The messages are mostly text-based, much of them on free message apps
They have an average of 10 social media and message apps (like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, WhatsApp), each of which fulfills different communication needs
Developing countries are home to the most prolific communicators (top 3: India, Brazil, and Mexico)
Screen time is their top form of entertainment, partly because they use multiple devices at once.
Young people average 31 hours of screen time in an average Saturday, with 10 of those hours going to TV and video
They spend the most time surfing the internet and watching TV
Much of their media use is “concurrent consumption” (consuming multiple forms of media at the same time, like web-surfing while watching TV or texting while on Facebook)
Second screening (using another device while watching TV) enables them to consume more, with chatting with friends the main activity and mobile phones the main device

Despite all their digital activity, young people really value real-world entertainment.
They spend almost half of their time at home on an average Saturday
They’re spending more time at home and with others, and less time by themselves
Hanging out with friends is the most entertaining activity, even though it occupies less of their time
7 in 10 say they don’t get to hang out with friends as much as they’d like
They place a high value on “offline” activities they do less frequently, like spending time with friends, pleasure reading, playing sports, going to movies, and shopping

They also value privacy, in the form of “me time” and possibly in their communication activity as well.
Young people are spending more time doing stuff alone before going to bed—up 30% in 5 years (57 minutes in 2009, 74 minutes in 2014)
TV is their main activity before going to sleep, followed closely by the internet and social media—suggesting that they’re going online while watching TV
They might be moving away from oversharing online, with 6 in 10 disagreeing that they try to be first to share stuff on social media and nearly 40% saying they’re using Facebook less and Twitter, WhatsApp, SnapChat, and Vine more

Though an endless amount of content is available, they focus on a few trusted resources.
8 in 10 say they rely on a few trusted sources to get the latest updates
On average, they turn to 8 favorite websites, 7 music artists, 6 TV channels, 6 brands, 5 stores, 4 magazines, and 4 radio stations
Their “inner circle” resources have grown in number since 2009 (adding 1 to 2 more favorites in each area)
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VIMN Insights: Beta Life Reloaded

On an average day, how do young people use the vast amount of media available to them? How are their entertainment habits evolving as technology plays a greater and greater role in everyday life?

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What’s Hot in Fashion Among Global Kids & Parents
What brands and styles are most appealing to global kids and their parents these days? And when it comes to developing a fashion sense, who are their biggest influences?
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Nickelodeon International recently conducted a study to learn more about how both groups feel about fashion:
From an early age, fashion is “hot.” Kids are involved in buying clothes, love to shop, and feel it’s important to be fashionable.
Looking good and feeling good are interconnected, with 9 out of 10 kids saying they feel happier wearing their favorite clothes and 80% reporting that they get excited to wear new clothes
Children love to shop and create unique looks for themselves—about 75% of kids like mixing and matching clothes to create their own style, and nearly 7 in 10 enjoy clothes shopping
Almost 60% enjoy wearing clothes featuring favorite TV characters
Kids and parents have similar favorite clothing items—but they add different accessories to make their outfits more distinctive and cool.
Sneakers, jeans, and tops are kids’ and parents’ favorite clothing items—though jeans are cooler to parents than kids
When they want to add “cool factor” to their outfits, kids and parents turn to sunglasses and backpacks
Kids are more likely than parents to accessorize their looks with sneakers and hats
Parents add belts, shoes, and scarves to make their outfits feel more hip
Friends have the most influence on kids’ fashion sensibilities, while parents look beyond their immediate circle.
While nearly 7 in 10 kids find out what’s cool from friends, less than 30% of parents do
After friends, kids pay attention to stores (44%) and TV shows (28%) to hone their personal style
Parents get style inspiration from stores (55%), the internet (46%), catalogs (41%), and magazines (39%)
Selena Gomez and Beyoncé are the celebrities with the coolest style to kids. Parents like them as well.
While parents also rate Selena Gomez and Beyonce’s style highly, they see David Beckham and Johnny Depp as cooler
Harry Styles and Miley Cyrus are least cool among kids and parents
Local celebrities tend not to be fashion icons in their own countries
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What’s Hot in Fashion Among Global Kids & Parents

What brands and styles are most appealing to global kids and their parents these days? And when it comes to developing a fashion sense, who are their biggest influences?

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Beta Life 2014   High-res

Beta Life 2014

What U.S. Hispanic Millennials Are Doing To Get Their Dream Jobs
How would U.S. Hispanic Millennials describe their ideal work situation? And what are they doing now to make sure they land their dream jobs in the future?[[MORE]] As part of its newly released 2014 study, Tr3s asked Hispanics ages 19 to 34 about how they’re preparing for a satisfying career. From that data, here are some of Tr3s’s latest insights:
An ideal job mixes “practical” with “heart and soul.” Just over half of Hispanic Adult Millennials say their dream job would be both practical and personally meaningful. Among those who lean in a particular direction, those who are 30 to 34 are much more likely to prefer work that’s practical (secure and with reliable benefits). Hispanic females would prefer careers that are both practical and meaningful, while males are more focused on being practical.
Non-Hispanic Millennials are more likely than Hispanics to say they’d like to follow their hearts. A quarter of non-Hispanic Adult Millennials report that they would like work that is more meaningful to them than practical, compared with 19% of their Hispanic peers. Hispanics are more likely to desire a combination of practical and meaningful.
Three-quarters of Hispanic Adult Millennials are taking active steps to get their dream jobs. Those who are younger (ages 19 to 29) are more likely than the 30 to 34 segment to say they’re working toward their ideal profession (78% vs. 69%). Possibly because more Hispanics are students and so many are unhappy in their jobs, employed Hispanics are more likely than employed non-Hispanics to report taking action toward their ideal jobs (80% vs. 70%).
Employed and unemployed Hispanic Adult Millennials are working toward their ideal jobs in different ways. Those with jobs are more likely than those without to be saving money and networking with others. Those without jobs are more likely to do online research and go to school/take classes.
Hispanic Millennials focus on education to prepare for their dream jobs; non-Hispanics are more engaged in networking and direct experience. When it comes to taking action toward getting their ideal careers, Hispanics with jobs tend to go the route of education (by taking classes and doing research). Non-Hispanics who have jobs are more likely to network, work/intern/volunteer at a position in their ideal field, and wait to be noticed in their current job.   High-res

What U.S. Hispanic Millennials Are Doing To Get Their Dream Jobs

How would U.S. Hispanic Millennials describe their ideal work situation? And what are they doing now to make sure they land their dream jobs in the future?

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In Turkey, Women Protest With Laughter
‘Women should not laugh in public’: This is what Turkey’s Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc declared at a celebration marking the end of Ramadan on Monday, July 28th.
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Additionally, he insisted in the importance of women’s chastity and fiercely criticized the ‘moral corruption’ occurring in Turkey. In response to this, thousands of Turkish women have posted pictures of themselves laughing and smiling on Twitter and Instagram. In one week, hundreds of thousands of social media comments were generated with the hashtag #kahkaha, meaning “laugh out loud” in Turkish.
Whereas women in Europe used to take the streets to defend their rights, today’s protests take place on social media networks. Over the past few years, Twitter has become a serious organizational tool and a space for self-expression in this country. As of July 2014, 72% of Turkish internet users own a Twitter account and 94% are on Facebook. Turkey has more than 38 million active social media users (47% of the total population), compared to the global average of 26%*.
VIMN´s research confirmed the high level of social media usage amongst Millennials in the country. The Turkish population is super-connected with 34.5 daily digital conversations vs. the global average of 18.5. 10 is the average age to create his or her first social media account. 80% consider that ‘having internet access is a basic human right’ compared to the global average of 68%.
´The Power of Laughter´- a recent international research study from Comedy Central – discovered that a large portion of users´ online consumption is focused on comedy.  Over the last few months, we have seen an explosion in the amount of online outlets whose purposes are to provide fun and laughter.
The study also found that laughter is a powerful force to be reckoned with. Laughing is beneficial in every aspect of people’s lives - emotional, social and physical. Emotionally, laughing helps create a happier state of mind and increases optimism: 83% of those who laugh frequently have a positive outlook on life, compared with only half (55%) of those who laugh less often. From a social aspect, laughing helps people become more influential, have more friends, become opinion leaders and overall are more outgoing. And last but not least, in terms of physicality, 80% of those who laugh frequently agree ‘their health improves when they laugh more’.
At the risk of displeasing Turkey’s Deputy Prime Minister, everybody should have the right to laugh - whatever their gender, in private or in public. This is what women in Turkey have proven this week by using an intelligent, impactful, and positive way of protesting: a smile can go a long way…*Source:  US Census Bureau, GlobalWebIndex (2014), The Next Normal (2012), Comedy Central Power of Laughter (2013)   High-res

In Turkey, Women Protest With Laughter

‘Women should not laugh in public’: This is what Turkey’s Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc declared at a celebration marking the end of Ramadan on Monday, July 28th.

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In the Future, Millennials Look Forward To Travel and New Friends
When Millennials think of their futures, two of their key hopes are to see the world and meet new people.This was a key finding from a new study by Viacom International Media Networks, “MTV Knowing Youth: 2020 Vision.”
[[MORE]]
This report, which also gave insight into who global Millennials are and how they envision the world in 2020, was based on an online survey of over 6,800 people ages 15 to 24 across 32 countries, as well as qualitative work in 17 markets. The qualitative work had a sample of 72 participants and included in-person interviews in respondents’ hometowns, as well as user-generated, ethnographic videos.
Taken from that report, here are some key insights on Millennials’ desires to travel and expand their personal connections:
They see travel as part of being a well-rounded citizen. Nearly all young people in every market spoke of a desire to travel, which is almost a rite of passage for Millennials. There is a sense that seeing more of the world can make you a better person. They also believe it’s necessary to visit other places in order to attain a balanced perspective and be a valid global citizen.
They’re looking to the whole world for educational and career opportunities. With communication being so global, Millennials are seeking out new possibilities far beyond their own towns and countries. This doesn’t feel wild or scary to them. Rather, it feels like something they need to do – and something that can be done easily. In China in particular, young people see traveling to America as necessary to get beyond the glass ceilings they feel are imposed on them at home. Across all markets, however, some see more opportunities for themselves abroad than in their native countries.
Meeting new people is a truly meaningful aspiration. The hyper-connected Millennial generation is constantly looking to broaden its networks. Millennials’ need to connect and share defines them — so it’s not surprising that so many speak of wanting to meet new people in the future. Whether at college, at work, or abroad, they look forward to making new friends to help them expand their outlooks. And while they love the close friends they have now, there is room for more. The more connections they have, the richer their lives will be.
Their desire to keep meeting new people acknowledges an innate expectation of change. Millennials live in a world that’s in flux – and they appreciate the challenges that change can bring. When they look ahead, they don’t picture themselves living in the same place and hanging out with the same people. They imagine their lives will constantly evolve to include new people, places, and experiences.   High-res

In the Future, Millennials Look Forward To Travel and New Friends


When Millennials think of their futures, two of their key hopes are to see the world and meet new people.This was a key finding from a new study by Viacom International Media Networks, “MTV Knowing Youth: 2020 Vision.”

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TV Must Be Accessible: Viacom International’s TV S.M.A.R.T. Project
 Content must be accessible not only by television, but also devices. This was a key finding from TV S.M.A.R.T., a new research project by Viacom International Media Networks (VIMN) that shows how and why TV viewing is changing around the world, and how advancements in distribution are changing the ways viewers consume and engage with content. [[MORE]]
Not long ago, the thought of having “TV content at our fingertips” might have conjured images of changing channels on a remote control or even turning a dial. Our selections were limited to whatever was airing at that time.
Now, “content at our fingertips” still often does involve a remote control and scheduled programming—but it could also mean a laptop, tablet, or smartphone. Unlike in the past, the available selections are nearly unlimited. With more access to content, there is not only more to watch but more opportunities to tune in.
The project’s main findings were that audiences still love TV and TV content, viewers use a “hierarchy of screens” to choose the devices they view on, and that in order to be successful, TV today must be S.M.A.R.T. (Social, Mobile, Accessible, Relevant, and Tailored).
We’re covering all of those elements in our series of posts on TV S.M.A.R.T.  Here, we’re focusing on “A” for Accessible:
Young viewers want content to be available whenever they want it.
The 14-to-24 age group is most likely to expect flexibility in the way content is delivered
90% in Europe use VOD at least once a month—and 80% use it at least once a week
Having access to time-shifted viewing doesn’t compete with linear TV viewing—it actually supports it.
In our deep dive of European consumers, 74% watch linear TV every day—but among those with TVs that connect to the internet, an even greater proportion (81%) engages in daily linear TV viewing
More access means more TV viewing overall—those with “connected” TVs don’t just watch more linear TV, they also watch more time-shifted TV (VOD and recorded/downloaded shows)
Viacom works with a number of partners to deliver valuable content to audiences in multiple ways.
We evaluate our partners very carefully, and these partnerships can take a number of forms—and we are focused on delivering our content to viewers in a S.M.A.R.T. way
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TV Must Be Accessible: Viacom International’s TV S.M.A.R.T. Project


Content must be accessible not only by television, but also devices. This was a key finding from TV S.M.A.R.T., a new research project by Viacom International Media Networks (VIMN) that shows how and why TV viewing is changing around the world, and how advancements in distribution are changing the ways viewers consume and engage with content.

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Tr3s: What Benefits Are U.S. Hispanic Millennials Getting at Work?
Many U.S. Hispanic Adult Millennial workers are employed in retail, sales, food, and construction—fields that they don’t generally see as ideal. They’re working mostly for the money now, but hope to advance into areas like technology, healthcare, education, and creative industries. So when it comes to benefits, what are their current situations offering? [[MORE]]
As part of its recently released 2014 study, “Hispanic Adult Millennials at Work and Play,” Tr3s asked U.S. Hispanics ages 19 to 34 about what employer-sponsored benefits they’re receiving. Here are key insights:
Just under half of employed Hispanic Adult Millennials have paid sick leave. They are slightly less likely than non-Hispanics to have employer-sponsored sick days (47% of Hispanics 19-34, 51% non-Hispanics). Among both Hispanics and non-Hispanics, the 30-34 age group is much more likely to have this benefit than 19-29s – probably because they’re much more likely to have full-time jobs. Among those with paid sick leave, 30-34s have more days than 19-29s.
4 in 10 Hispanics have medical insurance that’s at least partly paid for by their employer. Again, this benefit is heavily weighted toward the 30-34 age range (49% of Hispanic 30-34s have employer-sponsored medical insurance, 34% of 19-29s).
Nearly 1 in 4 Hispanics say they’ve had their hours cut to disqualify them from receiving health benefits. They’re significantly more likely to have had this experience than non-Hispanic Millennials (23% Hispanics 19-34, 14% non-Hispanics). Among Hispanics 19-34, males are being hit harder by this phenomenon than females.  Of those whose hours were reduced, Hispanics tend to say it’s because their company isn’t performing well financially. Non-Hispanics are more likely to blame the Affordable Care Act.
Two-thirds of Hispanics believe it’s hard to find a full-time job because employers want to avoid providing health benefits. Hispanic Adult Millennials are more likely to hold this belief than non-Hispanics (65% Hispanics 19-34, 55% non-Hispanics). But even though full-time work is preferable, a job’s a job: 3 out of 4 Hispanics 19-34 would be willing to accept a part-time job without health benefits.
A benefit gender gap exists among Hispanic and non-Hispanic young adults. Males 19-34, especially non-Hispanics, are more likely than females to have paid sick/vacation days and medical insurance. However, non-Hispanic females fare the worst, as the group in this age range least likely to receive these benefits.
Three-quarters of young adults believe there should be a law to guarantee paid sick days to workers. Hispanics and non-Hispanics 19-34 are in favor of such a law at almost the same rate. However, this is a more important issue to females, possibly because they’re more likely to take off from work when children are sick.   High-res

Tr3s: What Benefits Are U.S. Hispanic Millennials Getting at Work?

Many U.S. Hispanic Adult Millennial workers are employed in retail, sales, food, and construction—fields that they don’t generally see as ideal. They’re working mostly for the money now, but hope to advance into areas like technology, healthcare, education, and creative industries. So when it comes to benefits, what are their current situations offering?

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Indian Youth: Old-School Values in a Connected World
What values are most important to Indian young people today? And when it comes to the connection that technology can foster, what drives them? [[MORE]] This year, MTV India had conversations with more than 11,000 young people across more than 40 cities in India to find out. In this post and several upcoming ones, we’ll highlight findings from the comprehensive study of Indian youth that emerged, Curious Minds.
Back to the Future
Old school virtues are passé—or are they? The smart, old-world charm that often gets dusted under the rug is coming back with this generation! Young people are smart and pride themselves on being hard-working. Positivity and optimism are ingrained in their genes. They crave the respect and appreciation of their peers, not just the shine of money. And peeps are for keeps—friendship is to be cherished, not run over for quick wins. Shortcuts are out, honest hard work is in. Warm is the new cool.
Comfortable in their skin, the generation wants to win over the world—but on their own merit.
Connected and Curious
Young people today are inclined to explore more and question the ordinary. Aided by technology and the internet, information empowers them. Curating their own lives is important—they’d rather spend time exploring the world around them by age of 26 than be married and walking a set path. More than 54% agree that they would rather pursue their talent or interests than have just any job they can get their hands on.
Their curiosity and caring extends to the world they live in. Nearly three-quarters of the young we spoke to agreed that it was important to stay updated on the news—both national and international. In fact, more than half of them happily announce that the first thing they do in the morning when they wake up is to check their social media feeds. (Yes, they also sleep with their mobile phones close to them!)
Closer to home, they are proud of their country. They believe that the country has developed and has the potential for more development over the next five years. Although most find the electoral system complicated, they believe their vote can make all the difference, and more than 90% agree that it should be every Indian’s responsibility to stand up for what they believe in and cast a vote. This generation cares—and they’re not afraid to show it.
For more information on insights from MTV India, please visit http://www.mtvplay.in.   High-res

Indian Youth: Old-School Values in a Connected World

What values are most important to Indian young people today? And when it comes to the connection that technology can foster, what drives them?

Read More

Nickelodeon International: What’s Hot and What’s Not? – Athletes and Celebrities
What is popular right now among kids and their parents … and what’s not?
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To find out, Nickelodeon International recently conducted a study to learn more about what celebrities are trending among both groups. Fielded in February 2014, the project consisted of a 10-minute survey of kids and parents recruited from the Viacom online community across 10 countries/regions (UK, France, Spain, Germany, Italy, Russia, Brazil, Mexico, Australia, and Southeast Asia). Here are some key findings:
Parents vs. Kids
When it comes to TV, movie, and music celebrities, kids and parents share similar perceptions of who’s on top – although when you get past the highest-ranking favorites, kids and parents do have divergent feelings for some stars.
For sports heroes, however, kids’ idols are different from their parents’. Parents are also more likely than kids to be aware of and follow famous athletes.
Local vs. Global
International stars dominate the film and music industries, causing local movie actors and singers to lag behind global names in their popularity among parents and kids.
TV content, on the other hand, is more shaped by each country’s language and programs. As a result, regional TV actors perform well against international stars.
Similarly, sports celebrities generally have the highest profiles in their home countries because people like to support local athletes.
Celebrities
For kids, Real Madrid soccer player Cristiano Ronaldo is the top global sports superstar. Their parents, however, favor Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt and Russian tennis player Maria Sharapova.
The TV star who rates as most likeable among both parents and children is Victoria Justice from Nickelodeon show Victorious.
Johnny Depp is the most well-liked international movie star among both parents and kids. Selena Gomez also has high appeal, though she’s more admired by parents than kids.
Kids’ taste in music is similar to their parents—and among both groups, Beyoncé is the hottest singer of the moment. Generational differences set in for stars like Justin Timberlake, who parents tend to favor, and One Direction, who’s more popular among kids.
SpongeBob is the most loved children’s TV character, inspiring high levels of commitment, passion, and intimacy from parents and kids alike.   High-res

Nickelodeon International: What’s Hot and What’s Not? – Athletes and Celebrities


What is popular right now among kids and their parents … and what’s not?

Read More

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