Christian Kurz Speaks at Mipcom 2014

Earlier today, Christian Kurz, VP of Research and Insights at Viacom International Media Networks, presented some new research on young people and content consumption at Mipcom 2014 in Cannes, France.

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MTV Knowing Youth: Hobbies and Activities
How does money affect the way young people engage with activities that interest them? And how does social media influence their experience of hobbies?
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To gain a deeper understanding of young people and their hobbies, MTV recently conducted a study of young people ages 16-34 in seven countries who are interested in extreme sports, cooking, or photography. Here are key findings:
Not having much money keeps them from participating in some hobbies.
Young people perceive extreme sports as very expensive, but those who can’t afford to take part still get a thrill from watching them.
They find cooking fun, but buying all the ingredients to experiment with complex recipes can be expensive. Their kitchen skills tend to be basic, so being “adventurous” means improving upon what they know. Spending money on groceries for a dish that may not work out may be a risky investment.
For photography, instead of costly cameras they’re using smartphones that serve many purposes yet still take good pictures.
Social networks are a source of inspiration, as well as a place to share (and show off a little).
Extreme sports enthusiasts share photos and clips they find impressive—either of other people or, if available, of themselves. One source of frustration for those who participate in extreme sports is the difficulty of getting action shots.
Novice chefs get ideas from social media and the internet, as well as family and cookbooks. Facebook and Instagram are the most popular networks for sharing pics of kitchen creations, while Twitter is more effective for reaching a wider audience. Younger Millennials share cooking pictures the most, while adults’ pics are more about the social aspects of eating—happy families and friends around the table.
Smartphones and social media have made photography more spontaneous for young people. While they enjoy taking pictures, photography as a subject is not as compelling. They share pics to capture moments, as well as to promote themselves as active, interesting, and popular. Often, they take pictures to share on social media as part of a conversation—so the images themselves are more disposable and less meaningful.   High-res

MTV Knowing Youth: Hobbies and Activities

How does money affect the way young people engage with activities that interest them? And how does social media influence their experience of hobbies?

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Nickelodeon: South Africa Kids & Family Infographic   High-res

Nickelodeon: South Africa Kids & Family Infographic

Christian Kurz Published in Television Business International
Television Business International, a London-based publication specializing in the global television business, published an article by Christian Kurz, VP of Research and Insight at Viacom International Media Networks, in its August/September 2014 issue.[[MORE]] Christian’s essay, featured in the ‘Last Word’ column, focuses on the challenges and opportunities in creating ‘edutainment’ content for kids in a fast-changing media landscape. Here is the text from the article:S.M.A.R.T ‘Edutainment’The power of TV to educate has been a subject of debate for years, but the fact remains that kids learn best when they are engaged in activities that they enjoy and care about. They always have. Who doesn’t remember learning with Ernie, Big Bird, Elmo and my personal favourite, the Cookie Monster? Sesame Street has been the leader in utilising a detailed and comprehensive educational curriculum with specific educational goals in its content for the past 25 years.The fact is, in today’s age of “living media” (an active consumption of content made available anytime, anywhere, on any platform), TV has become S.M.A.R.T – Social, Mobile, Accessible, Relevant and Tailored. Even the youngest viewers inhabit a ‘media-rich’ environment of multichannel television, smartphones, tablets, the web and computer games.This creates enormous opportunities for content creators to embrace and revolutionise the concept of “edutainment” for an ‘always on’ generation. Today’s challenge is not only about working out what needs to be programmed on these devices, but also establishing the interface; how it should be constructed to appeal to kids preschool-plus and their parents.The truth is: digital literacy doesn’t start at 10-years-old. Our most recent research in the US shows that 65% of 3-to-5 year olds regularly use smartphones and tablets, which are present in 89% of those households. The usage numbers increase to 76% for the 6-11s – that’s higher than computers and games consoles for the first time. Internationally, penetration numbers among households with preschoolers are very similar, and kids, as we all know, like to spend time in front of screens, particularly touch-screens.So here lies the challenge and opportunity for kid’s content creators everywhere: to expand the traditional preschool-plus offering and enable kids to get up close and interactive with the big purple dinosaur, the pink pig and the yellow sponge through learning-based games, appisodes and more.Although certainly effective, it is no longer sufficient to simply implement ‘edutainment’ into the linear concept with a colourful character shouting questions out from TV land. When it comes to the post-Millennial generation, it’s all about engagement on every platform. Even the youngest kids demos today, 2+, are super savvy, demand immediate gratification and have an insatiable curiosity.Regardless of which end of the spectrum you look at, the fact remains: If you can’t engage kids, you can’t entertain or edutain them – and vice versa.There’s no disputing that technology has been the fundamental game-changer in how kids play and subsequently learn.With the influx of new technology and tablets and the advent of new distribution platforms, incorporating learning-based games and appisodes like Dora’s Learning Adventure to support early development by creating a place for kids to play, grow, learn and develop is now even more essential.Since many early experiences come from TV, it’s no coincidence that for most kids their first online destinations are related to TV content. Kids go to the web or apps to forge deeper relationships with content they already know and love, with interaction moving beyond a single screen experience to engagement across multiple platforms.This provides an infinite number of digital opportunities to play; real world play can be replicated virtually; virtual play can offer new experiences not available in the real world; kids can express creativity via videos, avatars, in games and apps, etc.More now than ever, kids networks are presented with huge opportunities to be innovative and creative with their content – taking the “what” and turning their attention to the “where” and the “how”.With shows like Nick Jr.’s Wallykazam and more recently Welcome to The Wayne launching on mobile before linear, there’s greater opportunity for networks to blur the lines between an ever-proliferating number of screens. Looking closely at the “how”, our research has reaffirmed that parents value security, entertainment and education for their kids’ TV viewing, spanning four distinct styles: the ‘Babysitter’ (the parent has low involvement); ‘tribes’ (the parent co-views with the child), ‘dialogue’ (the parent uses TV content to strengthen communication between themselves and their child) and ‘control’ (over the entire TV viewing experience).So, the key to edutainment in the era of living media? Simple-ish. Create captivating content with social and educational values at its core – don’t knock the power of a green frog or a pink pig – and combine the way kidswant to watch it with the tools necessary to interact with it, a camera, a microphone and a touch screen.The result? A plethora of opportunities to create engaging, entertaining content for kids of all ages to learn through play.
To see a PDF of the full August/September 2014 issue of Television International, click this link. Christian Kurz’s article is on page 50.   High-res

Christian Kurz Published in Television Business International


Television Business International, a London-based publication specializing in the global television business, published an article by Christian Kurz, VP of Research and Insight at Viacom International Media Networks, in its August/September 2014 issue.

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TV Must Be Relevant: Viacom International’s TV S.M.A.R.T. Project
In the past, TV content was viewable on one device: the TV set.While television sets remain the favorite way to watch video programming, they’re no longer the only option. [[MORE]] Now, TV content can accompany us through our days, via computers, tablets, and smartphones. With more fluid viewing options, we choose how we watch content based on our circumstances in the moment.
Whether they’re 9, 19, or 29, content must be relevant to consumers, in any way they choose to consume it.
This was a key finding from TV S.M.A.R.T., a new research project by Viacom International Media Networks (VIMN) that shows how and why TV viewing is changing around the world, and how advancements in distribution are changing the ways viewers consume and engage with content.
The project’s main findings were that audiences still love TV and TV content, viewers use a “hierarchy of screens” to choose the devices they view on, and that in order to be successful, TV today must be S.M.A.R.T. (Social, Mobile, Accessible, Relevant, and Tailored).
We’re covering all of those elements in our series of posts on TV S.M.A.R.T.  Here, we’re focusing on “R” for Relevant:
More than 4 in 10 TV viewers are accessing TV content online using methods other than a TV set.
Laptops and desktops are most commonly used for TV viewing (24% and 20%, respectively)
15% use smartphones, 7% use tablets, 4% use gaming systems
Viewers seek out the optimal viewing experience via a “hierarchy of screens.” They gravitate toward the best available screen—starting with the TV set.
If the TV set is in use or if the viewer wants more privacy, they’ll choose a desktop, laptop, or tablet as the next best screen
With the smallest screens, mobile phones are used primarily outside the home or when other devices aren’t easily accessible

Consumers want programming that is relevant to them, presented in an environment for them.
Super-serving our audiences is something they really appreciate
As examples, My Nick Jr. allows parents to create a customized channel for their preschool-age children and MTV Music, powered by Rhapsody, provides a personalized music experience through mobile
The incredible diversity of options can make it difficult for consumers to navigate the programming universe—so we’re making it easier for them to find content they will love
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TV Must Be Relevant: Viacom International’s TV S.M.A.R.T. Project

In the past, TV content was viewable on one device: the TV set.While television sets remain the favorite way to watch video programming, they’re no longer the only option.

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Spending and Saving Among Latin American Tweens
 What are Latin American tweens’ habits when it comes to spending and saving? A recent Nickelodeon study based on an online panel of children 9 to 14 in Argentina, Mexico, and Colombia sought to find out. [[MORE]]
Here are key findings from that analysis:
Saving gives tweens autonomy and freedom in their consumption choices.
They acquire the idea of saving at a young age
For many, saving is the only way to get things they really want
75% have their own money
They get cash as allowance, as gifts, or for doing chores
The habit of saving generally comes from parents
It’s important to tweens to make their own spending decisions.
They plan their purchases and look for a good deal
Parents influence spending decisions
On average, they save for larger items for 2 months to a year
They also like to treat themselves to snacks/sweets
The mall is the perfect place to shop—they can find everything they want there.  
A place to browse the latest trends and make/plan purchases
Family-friendly entertainment space: movies, food court, video games, window shopping
Tweens’ main interests when making purchases are fashion and technology.
Girls more interested in fashion; boys more into technology and sports
Fashion/trends drive consumption decisions—tweens are not brand-loyal, but do look for brands that speak to them
Technology is the most aspirational product category (most appealing: smartphones, tablets, and consoles)
Most tweens aspire to upgrade tech products they own to newer, faster models
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Spending and Saving Among Latin American Tweens

 
What are Latin American tweens’ habits when it comes to spending and saving? A recent Nickelodeon study based on an online panel of children 9 to 14 in Argentina, Mexico, and Colombia sought to find out.

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How Hispanic Millennials Are Consuming TV Content
Hispanic young adults are known for being early adopters of digital technology. In the past, Hispanic families have been more likely to have one TV set in the household that they sat down to watch together. With content now available on computers, tablets, and smartphones offers more options, how have their viewing habits changed?[[MORE]]
Tr3s talked to Latino young adults about what devices they prefer for watching TV content as part of its recently-released its 2014 study, “Hispanic Adult Millennials at Work and Play.”
Here are key insights from that study on the changing viewing habits of Hispanic young adults:
The “common area” TV set still dominates. Virtually all Hispanic and non-Hispanic Millennials said they watch content on a traditional TV set—and 9 out of 10 say that it offers the best experience. Among both groups, 7 out of 10 say their most of their “common area” TV set viewing happens with other people.
Tablets in the “common area” allow a social viewing experience with more choices. With tablets, it’s possible to watch whatever you want while still being in the presence of others. Among Millennials, 61% of Hispanics and 65% of non-Hispanics view content on their tablets while someone else watches a regular TV set in the same room.
Bedrooms are for “me time” viewing. Half of Hispanic and non-Hispanic Millennials watch TV content in their bedrooms, and 7 out of 10 watch alone. Many use computers and tablets here for entertainment content. (48% of Hispanics and 42% of non-Hispanics use computers for watching entertainment, 44% of Hispanics and 32% of non-Hispanics use tablets.) Tablets are highly personal devices that are less likely to be shared. 7 out of 10 Hispanic tablet users say they like to “cuddle up” with them in bed.
Smartphones are for watching content on the go, as well as for privacy. Nearly half (48%) of Hispanic Millennials watch TV on their smartphones to kill time while they’re out and about. They engage in smartphone viewing at a much lower rate than non-Hispanics (71%), likely because Hispanics tend to go out with others more than alone. Privacy is also a big draw for Hispanic and non-Hispanic young people—half of both groups view on their smartphones to watch what they want, when they want.   High-res

How Hispanic Millennials Are Consuming TV Content

Hispanic young adults are known for being early adopters of digital technology. In the past, Hispanic families have been more likely to have one TV set in the household that they sat down to watch together. With content now available on computers, tablets, and smartphones offers more options, how have their viewing habits changed?

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In Their Careers, Millennials Want Fulfillment and Diverse Opportunities
What do Millennials aspire to when they consider their career possibilities? How has coming of age in a difficult economy shaped their goals for future work? [[MORE]] 
These questions were answered in a new study by Viacom International Media Networks, “MTV Knowing Youth: 2020 Vision.” This report, which also gave insight into who global Millennials are and how they envision the world in 2020, was based on an online survey of people ages 15 to 24 across 32 countries, as well as ethnographic videos and interviews in 17 markets.
Taken from that report, here are some key insights on what Millennials think about their futures in the world of work:
A fulfilling job is their ultimate aim. Millennials want to find work that’s enjoyable and that brings meaning to their lives. Liking what they do is a primary goal – and the competitiveness of the job market may be what’s driving their desire for meaningful work. With low expectations for finding a high-paying job, they instead hope to find work that satisfies them in a deeper way.  
Money is secondary to happiness – and financial stability holds more appeal than wealth. For Millennials, a job that plays to their passions is preferable to one that simply pays well. Happiness comes first. They appreciate the value of emotional wealth highly — possibly more than previous generations. This is not to say that financial security is unimportant, however. Many talk about wanting money, but they’re not necessarily driven by the prospect of getting rich. Instead, their preference is to have enough financial stability for money not to be a concern.
They accept — and even welcome — the fact that a job for life is no longer as relevant now. Millennials realize that this way of looking at work is very different from their parents, who may have spent their entire careers in one job or field. They also recognize that there are new careers on the horizon that don’t even exist today. To set along a fixed path now could shut off further opportunities down the line.
They’re seeking out portfolio careers. Many Millennials have an area in mind that they’d like to pursue, but there is an underlying expectation that this is one step along a much larger journey. There will be twists and turns that they can’t foresee, so a portfolio career makes the most of their creativity and adaptability. This diversity of possibilities also provides an added sense of excitement about what the future will hold.
They can exercise different sides of themselves by pursuing multiple career paths.  Many young people dream of combining a creative profession (like singer, musician, artist, or entrepreneur) with something more traditional, like doctor or lawyer. A portfolio career like this allows them to express themselves in different ways and ensures that their lives are as fulfilling as they can be.   High-res

In Their Careers, Millennials Want Fulfillment and Diverse Opportunities


What do Millennials aspire to when they consider their career possibilities? How has coming of age in a difficult economy shaped their goals for future work?

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Comedy Central Power of Laughter Won Big at ESOMAR Congress 2014

Earlier today, Comedy Central International’s Power of Laughter project won the award for Best Methodological Paper at ESOMAR Congress 2014 in Nice, France. James Guerrier, Research Director for Comedy Central International, presented the study and accepted the award on behalf of all involved.

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Comedy Central and MTV India Present at ESOMAR Congress 2014
Viacom took the stage earlier today at ESOMAR Congress 2014, which kicked off in Nice, France on Sunday, September 7th. ESOMAR, a global organization that encourages, advances and elevates market research worldwide, has chosen the theme “What Inspires?” for this year’s three-day event.[[MORE]] Comedy Central’s James Guerrier, presented Power of Laughter, a study that measures comedy’s effectiveness in engaging audiences. Sumeli Chatterjee and Shibani Nayak of MTV India focused on the recent Curious Minds study in their session, “What Inspires the Curious Generation.”   High-res

Comedy Central and MTV India Present at ESOMAR Congress 2014


Viacom took the stage earlier today at ESOMAR Congress 2014, which kicked off in Nice, France on Sunday, September 7th. ESOMAR, a global organization that encourages, advances and elevates market research worldwide, has chosen the theme “What Inspires?” for this year’s three-day event.

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VIMN Insights: Beta Life Reloaded
On an average day, how do young people use the vast amount of media available to them? How are their entertainment habits evolving as technology plays a greater and greater role in everyday life? [[MORE]]
In 2009, MTV Knowing Youth conducted a study, “Beta Life,” to understand the impact of technology on global youth’s media and entertainment consumption. Earlier this year, MTV Knowing Youth commissioned another study to see what’s changed since 2009—and to identify what is most important to young people right now.
Here are key findings from this new project, called “Beta Life Reloaded”:
Young people are gorging on content and communications, averaging 3 hours of media activity for every hour they’re awake. 
They average 47 hours of media activity in an average Saturday (exceeding 24 hours because they consume multiple forms at once)
In 2009, they averaged 23 hours a day—which means their content consumption doubled in 5 years
For every hour they’re awake, they consume 3 hours of media and entertainment (15 hours awake, 47 hours of media)
They send an average of 69 digital messages per day, making communications are a staple of their daily diets.
The messages are mostly text-based, much of them on free message apps
They have an average of 10 social media and message apps (like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, WhatsApp), each of which fulfills different communication needs
Developing countries are home to the most prolific communicators (top 3: India, Brazil, and Mexico)
Screen time is their top form of entertainment, partly because they use multiple devices at once.
Young people average 31 hours of screen time in an average Saturday, with 10 of those hours going to TV and video
They spend the most time surfing the internet and watching TV
Much of their media use is “concurrent consumption” (consuming multiple forms of media at the same time, like web-surfing while watching TV or texting while on Facebook)
Second screening (using another device while watching TV) enables them to consume more, with chatting with friends the main activity and mobile phones the main device

Despite all their digital activity, young people really value real-world entertainment.
They spend almost half of their time at home on an average Saturday
They’re spending more time at home and with others, and less time by themselves
Hanging out with friends is the most entertaining activity, even though it occupies less of their time
7 in 10 say they don’t get to hang out with friends as much as they’d like
They place a high value on “offline” activities they do less frequently, like spending time with friends, pleasure reading, playing sports, going to movies, and shopping

They also value privacy, in the form of “me time” and possibly in their communication activity as well.
Young people are spending more time doing stuff alone before going to bed—up 30% in 5 years (57 minutes in 2009, 74 minutes in 2014)
TV is their main activity before going to sleep, followed closely by the internet and social media—suggesting that they’re going online while watching TV
They might be moving away from oversharing online, with 6 in 10 disagreeing that they try to be first to share stuff on social media and nearly 40% saying they’re using Facebook less and Twitter, WhatsApp, SnapChat, and Vine more

Though an endless amount of content is available, they focus on a few trusted resources.
8 in 10 say they rely on a few trusted sources to get the latest updates
On average, they turn to 8 favorite websites, 7 music artists, 6 TV channels, 6 brands, 5 stores, 4 magazines, and 4 radio stations
Their “inner circle” resources have grown in number since 2009 (adding 1 to 2 more favorites in each area)
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VIMN Insights: Beta Life Reloaded

On an average day, how do young people use the vast amount of media available to them? How are their entertainment habits evolving as technology plays a greater and greater role in everyday life?

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What’s Hot in Fashion Among Global Kids & Parents
What brands and styles are most appealing to global kids and their parents these days? And when it comes to developing a fashion sense, who are their biggest influences?
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Nickelodeon International recently conducted a study to learn more about how both groups feel about fashion:
From an early age, fashion is “hot.” Kids are involved in buying clothes, love to shop, and feel it’s important to be fashionable.
Looking good and feeling good are interconnected, with 9 out of 10 kids saying they feel happier wearing their favorite clothes and 80% reporting that they get excited to wear new clothes
Children love to shop and create unique looks for themselves—about 75% of kids like mixing and matching clothes to create their own style, and nearly 7 in 10 enjoy clothes shopping
Almost 60% enjoy wearing clothes featuring favorite TV characters
Kids and parents have similar favorite clothing items—but they add different accessories to make their outfits more distinctive and cool.
Sneakers, jeans, and tops are kids’ and parents’ favorite clothing items—though jeans are cooler to parents than kids
When they want to add “cool factor” to their outfits, kids and parents turn to sunglasses and backpacks
Kids are more likely than parents to accessorize their looks with sneakers and hats
Parents add belts, shoes, and scarves to make their outfits feel more hip
Friends have the most influence on kids’ fashion sensibilities, while parents look beyond their immediate circle.
While nearly 7 in 10 kids find out what’s cool from friends, less than 30% of parents do
After friends, kids pay attention to stores (44%) and TV shows (28%) to hone their personal style
Parents get style inspiration from stores (55%), the internet (46%), catalogs (41%), and magazines (39%)
Selena Gomez and Beyoncé are the celebrities with the coolest style to kids. Parents like them as well.
While parents also rate Selena Gomez and Beyonce’s style highly, they see David Beckham and Johnny Depp as cooler
Harry Styles and Miley Cyrus are least cool among kids and parents
Local celebrities tend not to be fashion icons in their own countries
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What’s Hot in Fashion Among Global Kids & Parents

What brands and styles are most appealing to global kids and their parents these days? And when it comes to developing a fashion sense, who are their biggest influences?

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Beta Life 2014   High-res

Beta Life 2014

What U.S. Hispanic Millennials Are Doing To Get Their Dream Jobs
How would U.S. Hispanic Millennials describe their ideal work situation? And what are they doing now to make sure they land their dream jobs in the future?[[MORE]] As part of its newly released 2014 study, Tr3s asked Hispanics ages 19 to 34 about how they’re preparing for a satisfying career. From that data, here are some of Tr3s’s latest insights:
An ideal job mixes “practical” with “heart and soul.” Just over half of Hispanic Adult Millennials say their dream job would be both practical and personally meaningful. Among those who lean in a particular direction, those who are 30 to 34 are much more likely to prefer work that’s practical (secure and with reliable benefits). Hispanic females would prefer careers that are both practical and meaningful, while males are more focused on being practical.
Non-Hispanic Millennials are more likely than Hispanics to say they’d like to follow their hearts. A quarter of non-Hispanic Adult Millennials report that they would like work that is more meaningful to them than practical, compared with 19% of their Hispanic peers. Hispanics are more likely to desire a combination of practical and meaningful.
Three-quarters of Hispanic Adult Millennials are taking active steps to get their dream jobs. Those who are younger (ages 19 to 29) are more likely than the 30 to 34 segment to say they’re working toward their ideal profession (78% vs. 69%). Possibly because more Hispanics are students and so many are unhappy in their jobs, employed Hispanics are more likely than employed non-Hispanics to report taking action toward their ideal jobs (80% vs. 70%).
Employed and unemployed Hispanic Adult Millennials are working toward their ideal jobs in different ways. Those with jobs are more likely than those without to be saving money and networking with others. Those without jobs are more likely to do online research and go to school/take classes.
Hispanic Millennials focus on education to prepare for their dream jobs; non-Hispanics are more engaged in networking and direct experience. When it comes to taking action toward getting their ideal careers, Hispanics with jobs tend to go the route of education (by taking classes and doing research). Non-Hispanics who have jobs are more likely to network, work/intern/volunteer at a position in their ideal field, and wait to be noticed in their current job.   High-res

What U.S. Hispanic Millennials Are Doing To Get Their Dream Jobs

How would U.S. Hispanic Millennials describe their ideal work situation? And what are they doing now to make sure they land their dream jobs in the future?

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In Turkey, Women Protest With Laughter
‘Women should not laugh in public’: This is what Turkey’s Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc declared at a celebration marking the end of Ramadan on Monday, July 28th.
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Additionally, he insisted in the importance of women’s chastity and fiercely criticized the ‘moral corruption’ occurring in Turkey. In response to this, thousands of Turkish women have posted pictures of themselves laughing and smiling on Twitter and Instagram. In one week, hundreds of thousands of social media comments were generated with the hashtag #kahkaha, meaning “laugh out loud” in Turkish.
Whereas women in Europe used to take the streets to defend their rights, today’s protests take place on social media networks. Over the past few years, Twitter has become a serious organizational tool and a space for self-expression in this country. As of July 2014, 72% of Turkish internet users own a Twitter account and 94% are on Facebook. Turkey has more than 38 million active social media users (47% of the total population), compared to the global average of 26%*.
VIMN´s research confirmed the high level of social media usage amongst Millennials in the country. The Turkish population is super-connected with 34.5 daily digital conversations vs. the global average of 18.5. 10 is the average age to create his or her first social media account. 80% consider that ‘having internet access is a basic human right’ compared to the global average of 68%.
´The Power of Laughter´- a recent international research study from Comedy Central – discovered that a large portion of users´ online consumption is focused on comedy.  Over the last few months, we have seen an explosion in the amount of online outlets whose purposes are to provide fun and laughter.
The study also found that laughter is a powerful force to be reckoned with. Laughing is beneficial in every aspect of people’s lives - emotional, social and physical. Emotionally, laughing helps create a happier state of mind and increases optimism: 83% of those who laugh frequently have a positive outlook on life, compared with only half (55%) of those who laugh less often. From a social aspect, laughing helps people become more influential, have more friends, become opinion leaders and overall are more outgoing. And last but not least, in terms of physicality, 80% of those who laugh frequently agree ‘their health improves when they laugh more’.
At the risk of displeasing Turkey’s Deputy Prime Minister, everybody should have the right to laugh - whatever their gender, in private or in public. This is what women in Turkey have proven this week by using an intelligent, impactful, and positive way of protesting: a smile can go a long way…*Source:  US Census Bureau, GlobalWebIndex (2014), The Next Normal (2012), Comedy Central Power of Laughter (2013)   High-res

In Turkey, Women Protest With Laughter

‘Women should not laugh in public’: This is what Turkey’s Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc declared at a celebration marking the end of Ramadan on Monday, July 28th.

Read More